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20110713
20110713
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
for a big law firm of the type that tony probably would not hold in the highest of esteem, but i'm delighted to be here. you know, i think if you talked to most authors, they will tell you that there is something hot-wired into our system that says we need to try to tell a story. there is nothing at all in my background. i am an absolutely accidental writer. there is nothing in my background which suggests i should be writing novels. i grew up in chicago. i write books about san francisco. i studied accounting at the university of illinois. i have been a corporate and securities attorney for 28 years. i've now written seven best-selling novels about murder trials, death penalty cases, and courtroom drama. i have never handled a criminal case in my life. [laughing] so all of you out there who are thinking of writing novels, there is hope. but i did have this feeling a long time ago, probably from the time i was in high school, that at some point i would like to try to write a novel. and i can't explain why. i do know that when i read "presumed innocent" on an airplane in 1988, i decided that
for you to join us and ask your questions as well. welcome, frank. i see that you brought a big aerial photograph with overly geology. >> it is a big google map with overly geology. the different colors depict the different formations or deposits beneath san francisco. san francisco is a young environment. it is a relatively young environment. the basement rock beneath san francisco is known as the franciscan complex or formation. it is throughout the city, most notably twin peaks, edge hill, telegraph hill. every once in awhile, you hear about those who make the news with a rock fall or landslide. usually occur in the telegraph and twin peaks. . above the rock are the soil deposits. the most common is dune sand. it is nothing but rocks that has been worn down from the sierras and deposited along the beaches. the wind blew that dune sand over most of the city. it is this mustard color. on the avenues, it is very thick. it can be up to 400 feet thick. as you moved south across slope boulevard, that is the tolar foundation. it was named after the first to score every in -- after the firs
highlight a couple of points that i think make a big difference. realize we have a cohort population between 8 million and 11.5 million of individuals in the united states who are undocumented, who some say are illegal or not lawfully present. they are in a group that is cut off in part and formality from the main economy. this is unwise because immigrants, both skilled and unskilled, in this case, that 8 million to 11 million, provide the innovative engine in the economy in these relatively dark times. i'll address the issue of unemployment. but in these difficult economic times, they provide a certain component to the economy which allows us to innovate and grow at a rate that we otherwise would not. in short, immigrants of all types unaverage are net contributors to the economy, help the actual pie grow bigger, provide more of a pie to split among us all and in turn try to goose innovation in a couple of unanticipated ways. so first, kind of three big points. immigrants are a net contributor to the economy. it is easy to be distracted by the fiscal analysis which is about tax revenues and
the flow -- float in our charter, and that is a big distinction with the alternative proposal that is still being marketed by mr. adachi. it is important for you to know that. that distinction called vested rights. many cities across the country -- when they have not considered the employees' pension has a vested right, they get into legal trouble very quickly. that is why you see litigation around the country sponsored by employee groups who have never been consulted with, being demanded that they pay more into the pension, but there is no consideration of their vested rights. that concept is embedded in our measure were in good and bad times, we share, so they get something out of this reform. because they get something out of it, they are vested in it. the unions continue to view, as i do, that the alternative proposal being sponsored by mr. adachi does not consider vested rights and therefore will be litigated. in that litigation, there is a great chance in my opinion that the proposal will lose. i am not the city attorney, but if you ask the city attorney, as we have -- and we have tha
for conference. that is a big step. you cannot just look at a bill and say that is it. there are all kinds of steps going on. if what you care about is not in the basic bill, it does not mean that it is over. that means you work to find the champion to will advance your cause. at this point, rather than focus on the specifics that need to be in the bill, the important thing is focusing on the fact that congress needs to do it, and the rest will naturally follow if we have the political pressure to get the different parts that people care about in. >> bill, you gave us a reality check earlier about what we can expect in a cir bill. what needs to happen, what is likely to happen before a bill is authored? what compromises to you think will be made? >> mary and i are friends, but let me respond to her because i think she was responding to me. [laughter] , to believe, mary, that things will be resolved in conference -- i want to believe, mary that things will be resolved in conference. maybe because i am older than mary, i remember what happened with the 1990 and 1996 legislation where bad stu
him since 1966. i was not in business until 1961. he made a big deal out of working in clay. the things he was doing was something never seen before. >> it is a large scale bronze. it has been sitting here of the hall of justice since 1971. talk about what happens to the work of art out of the elements. >> the arts commission commissioned the piece. they did not set aside money for repair. it has slowly changed color. it was black. it has been restored. >> it has been restored to the original patina. >> there was no damage done to its. i do not think there were any holes made in it. they have been working on it for six or eight weeks. it is practically ready to go. i am very excited to see it done. >> over the course of the arts in richmond program, we have added almost 800 works of art into the public space. maintaining that is not something that the bond funds allow us to do. this is why you came up with the idea of art care. >> i hope we get the community going and get people who really like to be involved. we will give them a chance to be involved. if you are interested
. >> the other big shock is that the moderates seem to have won this round. people thought, progressives have themselves on the board. there is no reason that they will not get together and take a noted leader who is a progressive to be interim mayor, and then stayed there for another term. the great thing about being in term mayor is to get to run as an incumbent. the fact that the progressives could not get together to get somebody into office as interim mayor in their own self-interest was very surprising for a lot of us. >> what happened in the last month in city hall was an incredible show of democracy that was part policy, part politics, and it all came together, and more than anything -- not just from a reporter's perspective, often was this? but there was a public interest as well on what was going on in san francisco government. we take it for granted a law that there is a city government here. this was something that brought people together. you heard people talking about it at the cafes, park playground, people who do not always pay attention. in that $0.10, it was the best thing w
francisco, and being the mayor of san francisco, i'm sure his heart is as big as mine in terms of what this means to the residents of san francisco, so i want to introduce the mayor to everyone. [applause] >> thank you very much. i want to also continue the very important attribute that we have for eloise westbrook. when i was just a young workers never trying to cause trouble in the city on behalf of low-income residents, i have already heard of ms. westbrook. she was already helping lead the effort to improve housing conditions for all of our public housing tenants. my today, it is just really appropriate to make sure that our city honors mr. westbrook, her family, who is here today, i know. thank you very much for being here. this is very appropriate that this new project be in the name and westbrook loss of the another great place for people to understand and know about the history of the city. i am so happy to be part of this great city when it names and after people in the community who have done great work. i recognize that, and i know doris, our supervisor, was there as well. s
. this is from here. and this is where it comes from." and that's a big deal. information is a big deal. >> the restaurant has an extremely busy kitchen. but to mills, who's in his sixties, it's like home from home. he knows about the stresses chefs face, since he used to be one. for 14 years, he was the head chef for randy parary restaurants in sacramento. today, he's traded in his chef's hat to promote, educate, and even celebrate produce with other chefs. >> i use email. i use the phone. but the best thing to do is to be able to go into a restaurant, to go into the kitchen, to find the person cooking the food, and say, "hey, what can i get you? what are you looking for?" >> i would just be doing seed production if it weren't for jim driving in here and refusing to drive away and sayin "no, i really want this stuff. no, you don't understand, i really do want to buy this stuff." and "i really want this, and i really want it now, and i really want some, and i wnt samples," and you know, so forth and so on despite my best efforts to get rid of him. >> as chef michael tuohy starts prepari
of tonight's award recipients. let's give them a big round of applause. [applause] very important to work in contributions on behalf of the community. and for inspiring us to be better citizens and activists. and a special thanks and recognition to tobin for overseeing the awards committee and to all the committee members for their time and hard work. out come the best part of all. we have been waiting for this fabulous reception in the greenroom, being catered by chefs and their restaurants to offer the best asian-pacific cuisine in the bay area. without this support, this event would not be such a success. at this time, please welcome them. great restaurants, although you are going to see for yourself. >> how is it going, everybody? who is hungry now? better yet, who wants free food? anyway, i just want to say, i'm from the san francisco street grid, and i'm speaking here representing all the chefs tonight. peter makes delicious dim sum. and thomas, with great singapore food. we just want to thank you so much for letting us be part of this awards show. and we are so proud to be here. af
gave you a big break in your career early on. ek: yes, he did, as an actress. it was very frightening, working with orson welles, because being as physically huge as he was and having to . well, at that time i was very, very small, like in my teens still. and to work with him was not always the most exciting thing in the world in the manner in which you would think this is, "oh my goodness, this is so exciting. " but it was very scary. and at . at the same time, it was very exciting because i was learning so much all the time, particularly when he was with michael mcleimore and hilton head was from the gate theater in dublin and we would all go to lunch . the four . the three of them and me. they would take me to lunch at the calabdos restaurant in paris. and with each of sip of food and with each sip of a drink, they would get up and they would start talking and reciting shakespeare. or marlowe. or even jesus christus, you know. and it was so exciting that i never wanted to move. i was like a fly on the wall. that's why . i think he said i was the most exciting woman in the world, be
with all of the impacts of a hospital decide they want -- they want a big hospital and want to have to take care of everything else. i am very careful to know how each supervisor feels about the impact on the project. i would like cpmc to be successful because they do not have a lot of time. we would do the best we can and review every aspect of this so that they have the best chance of success. >> the issue of the state budgets have affected many local businesses. is there any way that the city could help more nonprofits? >> that is why i am proposing a set sales tax. the state did make some severe cuts. we do not know when those cuts will start that impacting the nonprofits. as you know, through our city budget, if you ask many of the nonprofits, they're pretty happy. we restored a lot of the original cuts. their services reflect the values that i hold, board of supervisors hold. now the state is making cuts, some in the same places that we've restored. we cannot promise to back fill all of those cuts. we can promise to go through the same process and asked what are the critical services
congratulations to lisa. [applause] >> wow. this is really big. and really heavy. going to break it down. going to put it down before i break it. how are you guys doing? ok. well, just a few people that i would like to thank. first of all, definitely the a.p.a. heritage celebration committee, thank you so much for putting this on. i know it's a volunteer committee. so we definitely understand how that is. an all-volunteer run organization. and also, thank you to the panel of judges for this incredible honor. really, really just surprised and humbled by it. and with that said, i share this award with my fellow nominees, andrew and nikki. you guys are amazing. please continue to do everything that you're doing right now. because you guys are an inspiration to us all at hyphen. somebody very important that i would like to thank as well, melissa hung who was sitting right over there, melissa, can you wave? [applause] she's actually the founder of hyphen magazine eight years ago, if melissa did not have the vision to create our very own asian-american publication, hyphen would not be here today. so
this was a big conspiracy to frame this man. what i learned is -- and i discussed this with geronimo -- we are experiencing men and women who thought the end justified the means. they thought they had a bad man and it was ok to do anything necessary to convict him. as i look back on my career, present and future, i think we see that that is the concept that runs through police misconduct. i am sure there are officers who were just bad, let's say. i think officers see what they consider bad people, and they feel like they have to do what ever it takes to convict them. and i have seen it when i was a young lawyer, when we had narcotics teams, we would get clients to said they arrested me with $20,000 and they said i only had $10,000. and we knew there were telling the truth. it i have seen it with law- enforcement officers in the case where a rogue cop shot a young girl, and the four other officers were all good men. remember -- you talk about misconduct, but primarily -- i want to get back to this -- most law enforcement people i have grown to know in my career are good and i think want to
day our members show courage in bay area courts, and we do ok in the big battles as well. who will ever forget the extraordinary accomplishments of john in defending our college, patrick, from a crazy federal prosecutor in nevada? that level of talent and that level of courage is unique, but every day criminal courts in the bay area shine because my colleagues from ctla are working there. recently ctla issued a public statement against the death penalty. ctla joins other groups and individuals here today in calling for permanent incarceration as california's alternative to the death penalty. this city and county has a great san francisco public defender and we want to express our thanks to jeff adachi for his support of ctla over the years and for his gratitude for being here today. thank you for your taxi and have a great conference -- thank you for your attention and have a great conference. [applause] >> i also want to acknowledge the public defender, past-present president of the california lawyers association. thank you for being here. now, we have our 50th anniversary tr
, and a 1 inch rod that went from the wall to the middle of the street. they had a big blob of concrete that went from the wall, the rod, and then the block of concrete. if the wall tried to move, it would engage the rod, which would engage the block of concrete. these were built as gravity walls. they're very, very wide at the base. gosh, some of them are six, eight, 10 feet wide, and they are like dams. they are faced with basalt blocks that came from the quarries in marin county. they have performed very well. the classic gravity wall. there is enough friction along the base, and there is a slope on the backside, so there is enough weight pushing down on the wall that keeps it from moving. >> this is on broadway, along rage and russian hill. >> that is a completely different design. this is truly what is called a cantilever retaining wall. it is designed to rotate and move. you can see the quality of construction. probably what they did in those days, they would take the rock that was present in the vicinity and mix it with the cement and create concrete. so there is no quality contr
series is a big event. for us to assemble all of this and liz bonn, -- lisbon, starting the world series, major planning and logistical. we will pick up all of that equipment in portugal and transport it and reset it in plymouth some 30 days later. in the world series, today, we have the team that will be participating. the boats are and progress of being assembled, tested. more than just the five people on the boat. each boat will carry up to 25 people as part of their team to participate. of course, this is all about the america's cup coming here in 2013. the america's cup world series provides not only the background for the teams to practice, learn how to sail catamarans, wind sails, what with their sponsors to win the event, but it also allows us to educate us about the role that we raise in, educate the people out there fascinated by these boats, and allows us to bring it to the people, prior to coming to san francisco. we hope to bring an enormous event here to san francisco. the early signs for the ac 45's, which are really the training wheels for the ac 72's that will be perform
to be more kid- friendly, more youth-oriented. i think you could have a big input to make sure that what we are doing will be there for you to raise families as well. i want to congratulate all the nominees tonight. all of you who have been participating in this competition for the fellowship have been doing great work. i have been reading through some of the accomplishments that you are a part of. i got to meet some of you, luckily, last month when you participated in youth advocacy day, but you also followed up -- some of you were at the old school cafe with what house representatives about what the youths were looking at in terms of their future, participation in the city. here in city hall, we are serious about having programs that not only help you out, but to make sure you get the support you need to be successful. we want you and need you to be successful. without that, we are literally a soulless city. whether it is being able to traverse on a good muni system, having a good education system, or being able to work in a company like twitter. i am working with two great supervisors an
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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